Tag archives for Studera.nu

Studera.nu is no more — Long live Universityadmissions.se

When you apply for university level studies in Sweden you are bound to come in contact with Sweden’s national (online) application portal. The Swedish Agency for Higher Education Services (VHS), which is responsible for the application and admission process, has recently unveiled Universityadmissions.se.

Universityadmissions.se
Universityadmissions.se is directed exclusively to international students applying for higher education in Sweden. So if you are from Sweden or want to apply for programs held in Swedish — you should instead go to Antagning.se. I hope and believe that Universityadmissions.se will be a step forward compared to the now defunct application portal Studera.nu, which received substantial criticism (sometimes well deserved) for its lack of usability.

So what’s new, what does it do, and how do I use it?

In short, Universityadmissions.se provides a searchable database of all degree programs and courses that are available for international applicants. When the application period for Autumn 2012 has started (December 1, 2011), it is through Universityadmissions.se that you send in your online application, pay the application fee (if applicable), follow your application in progress (including sending in the required documentation) — and when you have received your notification of selection results, reply to any offers of admission.

However, before you get carried away and start with your online application I would recommend that you have a look at the general guidelines about how to apply to higher education in Sweden at Studyinsweden.se.

Study in Sweden 2011

Study in Sweden

The application period for international students wanting to study in Sweden in the fall 2011 is closing on Monday, January 17.  Hurry up and apply if you have not done it yet as submissions after this date will be considered late.  A few courses and programmes may still allow for a late application after January 17. These have an “Add” button in the course search on Studera.nu. But late applications will be processed by universities only if time allows and places have not been filled.

Also, be sure to submit your supporting documentation and/or payment latest January 28. See Studera.nu for the latest information.

Except for following the applications for fall semester, we are in the middle of planning our events for 2011. We will be writing continuously during the year about the events we are attending and organizing. We already know that we will be present at the student fair, EHEF, in Hong Kong, March 12-13. This event will be organized together with the Swedish General Consulate in Hong Kong.

Hope to see you at one of our events during 2011 or at a university in Sweden soon!

Time for christmas and time to apply

Christmas and New years is coming up. 2010 has been hectic and fun year for us – education fairs in Hongkong, Moscow and India, a seminar during the world EXPO in Shanghai, a Chinese version of  studyinsweden.se, 3000 new members on our community swedenintouch.se, and much more.

But, it’s not only time for Christmas and contemplation. In fact we are in the middle of the application period for the semester 2011 – 2012. The last day for applying  is 17 January, studera.nu is the central application service. The first step to applying for a master’s program is finding the perfect one. You can search our program database of over 500 master’s degree programs (and 35 bachelor’s level programs) given in English at www.studyinsweden.se/course-search.

We follow the process closely and look forward to see how many students we can welcome to Sweden during next year.

Happy holidays everyone, and good luck with your applications! See you in 2011.

A white and snowy christmas in Sweden

Time to apply

Are you thinking about applying for higher education studies in Sweden for the academic year 2011-2012? In that case, here’s a few things you need to know:

Online application service at Studera.nu

The application period for programs that start autumn 2011 has just begun. For most programs the application deadline is January 17, 2011. You might also want to start looking into scholarship possibilities, since most of the scholarship deadlines are also set to the end of January.

For bachelor’s level and master’s level studies you need to apply via the online application service at www.studera.nu. For studies at doctoral level you apply directly to your chosen university.

Applying to a master’s degree program can seem overwhelming, so we’ve broken the process down into five steps:

1. Find your program

The first step to applying for a master’s program is finding the perfect one. You can search Studyinsweden.se’s program database of over 600 master’s degree programs (and 35 bachelor’s level programs) given in English at www.studyinsweden.se/course-search.

2. Apply

Once you’ve identified which program/s you’d like to apply for, use the application instructions available at www.studera.nu. Studera.nu is a central application service where you can apply for up to four different master’s programs at different universities around Sweden with just one application.

Each program has a special application code which you must use in the application to ensure that you apply to the correct program. You can find each program’s code at www.studera.nu or, usually, in the program description at the university’s homepage.

Please note that students who are not citizens of the EU, EEA or Switzerland are required to pay an application fee of SEK 900.

At this point you should also look into the possiblities of scholarships. For scholarships that are administered by the Swedish Institute, I recommend that you use this guide to see if you are eligible to apply to any of them.

3. Wait to receive notification of acceptance

After the deadline passes, your application will undergo a selection procedure determined by the individual school and based on various criteria, such as grades obtained and results of previous courses and degree projects. All of these will influence the outcome of your application.

If you are accepted you will need to confirm that you will attend the program in question. If you are not a citizen of the EU, EEA or Switzerland you will also be required to pay the tuition fee for the first year of study at this point. If you are in doubt whether you are required to pay tuition fees, Studera.nu provides a helpful guide.

4. Apply for a residence permit

As the application process for visas and residence permits can be lengthy, you should apply as soon as you have received your acceptance letter!

Generally speaking, in order to obtain a residence permit for studies you will need to show that you:

  1. have been accepted to a full-time study program (if you are not a citizen of the EU, EEA or Switzerland this includes paying tuition fees for the first year of study)
  2. can support yourself financially throughout the entire period of study (you must show proof that you have access to or funding of 7,300 SEK per month of your stay)

Specific information about application residence permits, as well as application forms, can be found at the Swedish Migration Board.

Note: students from the Nordic countries and the EU/EEA do NOT need to apply for residence permits, but should rather (in the case of a non-Nordic EU citizenship) register with the Swedish Migration board upon arrival.

5. Come to Sweden

Once you’ve been accepted on a program and your residence permit has been processed, check out our guide to living in Sweden for information on how to prepare for your stay. I also recommend that you have a look at SwedenInTouch, Sweden’s official community for international students (if you haven’t already). There you’ll find all kinds of tips from current and former students at Swedish universities. Your university’s international office can also offer tips and advice.

Good luck!

A brief guide to studying in Sweden

Well, essentially that is what our web site Studyinsweden.se is all about. Although you should take the time to read up on most of the things we cover there, as well as look more deeply into the universities and study programs you are contemplating, I thought I’d gather a few tips of things to have in mind when considering to study in Sweden.

– What makes Sweden different?

Every country’s educational system has its own distinct profile and higher education in Sweden stands out in several areas. The open, informal relations between students and teachers are often cited as typical of university studies in Sweden. This does not only mean that you are on a first-name basis with your teachers and professors, but perhaps more importantly it means that you are expected to think for yourself and argue for your cause. Students should develop their own academic intellect and not just repeat the teacher’s words. Hence, personal initiative and critical thought is expected of you if you are to do well on your exams and papers. At the same time there is also an emphasis on group work. Expect to be thrown into different constellations where you will apply methods and theories in practical situations.

(You can read more about the nature of Swedish higher education in our section called “Why Sweden?”.)

What and where do you want to study?


Some students have a clear image of what they want to achieve through their studies, and some have even focused their attention on a specific study program at a specific university. Most students however are a bit in the dark when it comes to making the choice. Our program database and university map may hopefully be of assistance, but even after reading up on program descriptions and university profiles it may be difficult to differentiate between the multitude of available programs and educational institutions. Sweden has a mix of universities — large and small, old and new, research-oriented and student-centric, more academically grounded and more practically focused — and the variations between faculties within the universities may sometimes be more distinct than between the universities themselves. What to make of all this? Look into what you want to get out of your studies and try to find the program that suits you — but don’t always expect the choice to be evident. At least it never was for me.

(If you want to talk to someone with first-hand experience of the program or university you are considering — check out www.swedenintouch.se.)

– The application

Once you’ve identified which program/s you’d like to apply to, you will inevitably get in contact with the central online application service at www.studera.nu. The only caveat would be if you are applying for a PhD program or one of the (mainly in the field of Fine arts) few programs that relies on different application procedures and application deadlines. When applying to your chosen programs at Studera.nu, you will also need to pay an application fee (of SEK 900)*. At this point you should also apply for any scholarships that might be available.

After the deadline passes, your application will undergo a selection procedure determined by the individual university, usually based on criteria such as your grades and results of previous degree projects and academic theses. The decision on whether to accept an applicant ultimately rests with the academic institutions themselves as long as you fulfill the general requirements.

If you are accepted to any of the programs you have applied to, you will need to confirm that you will attend the program in question. At this point you will also need to pay the tuition fee for the first year of study.* If you have received a scholarship that will cover your tuition fees, just make sure to confirm that you will attend the program.

Next up is to apply for a residence permit from the Swedish Migration Board (unless you are an EU/EAA citizen, in which case you only need to register with the Swedish Migration Board upon arrival). As the application process can be lengthy, you should apply as soon as you have received your acceptance letter. Generally speaking, in order to obtain a residence permit for studies you will need to show that you:

  1. have been accepted to a full-time study program (if you are not a citizen of the EU, EEA or Switzerland this includes paying tuition fees for the first year of study)
  2. can support yourself financially throughout the entire period of study (you must show proof that you have access to funding of SEK 7,300 per month of your stay)

– The final step (which really is the starting point)

Come to Sweden.

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*Swedish and EU/EEA citizens (and Switzerland) are exempt from application and tuition fees. If you are in doubt whether you need to pay tuition fees — check out the ‘personas’ at Studera.nu.