Tag archives for main course

Salmon pudding

Photo: Pål Allan/imagebank.sweden.se

 

Salmon pudding
Main course
4-6
 

Salmon pudding is based on the traditional Swedish housewife’s firm conviction that a good dinner provides an excellent basis for the next day’s lunch. With a little salmon, a little cream and a little potatoes, you can go a very long way. As usual in home cooking, it is possible to vary the ingredients, provided you control the amount of salt. Thus the salmon in the pudding may be boiled, cold-smoked or hot-smoked, since the basic rule is always that “you take what you have” at home. The main thing is to make sure that the result is delicious. Salmon pudding is traditionally eaten with melted butter. A little fresh lemon juice is a tasty alternative.
Ingredients
  • 400 g (14 oz) salt-cured salmon
  • 1½ kg (3¼ lb) unpeeled potatoes
  • 4 eggs
  • 300 ml (1½ cup) heavy whipping cream
  • 300 ml (1½ cup) milk
  • 2 onions
  • 1 large bunch of dill
  • salt, white pepper

Instructions
  1. Boil the potatoes, and peel them once they have cooled.
  2. If desired, presoak the slices of salmon in milk or water for a few hours to draw out the salt.
  3. Peel and slice the onion. Sauté it in a little butter until it softens, without browning.
  4. Grease an ovenproof baking dish, cover the bottom with potato slices, spreading half the onions on top and then half the salmon and chopped dill. Cover with a new layer of potato slices, then the rest of the onion, salmon and dill. Finish with a layer of potato slices.
  5. Beat together milk, cream and eggs plus salt and pepper.
  6. Pour this mixture on top of the salmon pudding and finish with a few pats of butter.
  7. Bake in oven (200°C/400°F) for 45–60 minutes, or until the pudding feels firm.
  8. Serve with melted butter.

Pickled herring with bean and potato salad

Photo: Johan Jeppsson

 

Pickled herring with bean and potato salad
Main course
4
 

Having served as staple food in Sweden for centuries, even millennia, herring still has a central place on our smorgasbord. Most Swedes cannot imagine Midsummer or Christmas celebrations without it. And it is still usually served the old, pickled way. This is a recipe for the more Baltic-style herring, which is first fried then pickled, served with new accessories.
Ingredients
  • 4 fillets of fried pickled herring
  • 1dl (3½ oz) large white beans, soaked overnight and boiled, or canned
  • 8 potatoes, boiled and cut into pieces
  • 2 small onions, chopped
  • 3 cloves of garlic, sliced
  • 2 tablespoons almond, blanched and chopped
  • 3 spring onions, chopped
  • juice of 1½ lemon
  • 3 tablespoons ground sumac
  • 4 tablespoons dill, chopped
  • 3 tablespoons olive oil
  • butter
  • chili, salt and pepper

Instructions
  1. Fry the almond in butter together with the onions and the garlic. When browned, add sumac (a Middle Eastern spice with a lemony flavor) and stir.
  2. Mix the beans and potatoes with lemon juice and olive oil. Season with chili, salt and pepper. Slowly stir in spring onions, dill and the almonds. Mix carefully and season again.
  3. Serve the spicy salad with fried pickled herring. Top off with a sprig of dill.

Notes
In Sweden, fried pickled herring can be bought in many supermarkets, but here is a quick guide to how you can prepare it yourself: 1. Roll fresh, cleaned herring in rye flour, salt and white pepper, and fry it in butter. 2. Mix one part distilled white vinegar (12%), two parts sugar and three parts water in a pot, and boil for a few minutes together with some sliced onion and carrot and a teaspoon of whole allspice. 3. Pickle the fried fish in the cooled sauce.

The recipe was created by Marcus Samuelsson. Marcus Samuelsson was born in Addis Ababa in Ethiopia in 1970, and adopted by Swedish parents at the age of three. Set on becoming a chef early on in life, Samuelsson had his breakthrough as chef for well-reputed New York restaurant Aquavit in the mid-1990s with his Scandinavian cooking.

Today, he is involved in several restaurants, among them the Swedish Aquavit restaurant in Stockholm, is a guest professor at Umeå University School of Restaurant and Culinary Arts, and has written several inspiring cook books. Samuelsson was also chosen as guest chef for US President Barack Obama’s first official state dinner.

Raggmunk

 

 

Photo by Jon Åslund

Raggmunk
Main
4-6
 

Raggmunk is the name for a Swedish potato pancake. The pancakes are fried in butter and served with fried pork and lingonberries. They cannot be made using new potatoes, since potatoes that are harvested in early summer do not contain enough starch to hold the pancake together.
Ingredients
  • 1 egg
  • 90 g (3 ¼ oz) wheat flour
  • 300 ml (1½ cup) milk
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 800 g (28 oz) potatoes
  • 50 g (2 oz) butter
  • 400–500 g (14–18 oz) salt pork
  • raw stirred lingonberries

Instructions
  1. Make a pancake batter using the egg, flour and milk. Add salt.
  2. Peel the potatoes and grate them.
  3. Mix in, then fry small patties of the potato pancake batter in butter until golden brown on both sides.
  4. Fry the pork until crunchy.
  5. Serve with raw stirred lingonberries.

Kroppkakor

Photo: Per-Erik Berglund/imagebank.sweden.se

 

Kroppkakor
Main
4-6
 

Kroppkakor is Swedish for filled potato dumplings. Potatoes have been the staff of life in Sweden during the past few centuries. Despite a variety of local names, potato dumplings are eaten throughout the country.
Ingredients
  • 10 medium-sized potatoes
  • 2–3 egg yolks
  • 150–189 g (5–6½ oz) wheat flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 onion
  • 200 g (7 oz) salt pork
  • 2 tsp cracked allspice

Instructions
Kroppkakor:
  1. Peel and boil the potatoes. Mash them and mix with the egg yolks and salt. Let the purée cool, then mix in the flour.
  2. Knead the dough thoroughly and shape into a roll.
  3. Chop the pork into small cubes and dice the onion. Fry the pork quickly with the onion and mix with the allspice.
  4. Cut the potato roll into inch-thick slices, make a depression in the center of each slice and fill it with the pork mixture.
  5. Flatten each dumpling so the pork mixture is in the middle and roll into a smooth, even ball.
  6. Boil the dumplings slowly in a pot of lightly salted water without a lid for 5–6 minutes after the dumplings rise to the surface.
Presentation:
  1. Serve with lingonberries and melted butter.
  2. The dumplings can also be cut in half and fried in butter.

Reindeer meatballs with glazed garlic confit and red cabbage

Photo: Johan Jeppsson

  

Reindeer meatballs with glazed garlic confit and red cabbage
Main course
4
 

Swedes have eaten reindeer meat since at least the ninth century B.C. Back then, it was all about hunting, now it’s a proper industry. More than 200,000 reindeer are herded by around 4,500 reindeer owners in the northern third of Sweden. Reindeer husbandry is an old Sami right, and forms the basis of their culture. This recipe uses reindeer meat to give a new touch to traditional Swedish meatballs.
Ingredients
  • 8 pieces of reindeer sirloin, 1 ½ tbs/20 g each
Meatball mix:
  • 1 small red onion, finely chopped
  • 2 tbs breadcrumbs
  • 0,5dl (1¾ oz) cream
  • 2 eggs
  • 300g (10½ oz) ground beef and pork meat
  • salt and freshly ground pepper
  • butter, olive oil
Honey-glazed garlic confit:
  • 4 garlics, in cloves and peeled
  • 4 fresh thyme sprigs
  • 1 dl (½ cup) balsamic vinegar
  • 1 dl (½ cup) honey
  • 1 cinnamon stick
  • butter
  • salt and freshly ground pepper
Spicy red cabbage:
  • ½ head of red cabbage, finely chopped
  • 1 tsp garam masala
  • 2 small red onions, chopped
  • 1¼dl (0,6 cup) liquid honey
  • 1dl (½ cup) port
  • fresh thyme
  • 2 tbs demerara sugar
  • 2 cinnamon sticks
  • salt and freshly ground pepper
  • oil

Instructions
Reindeer meatballs:
  1. Sauté the onion in butter and leave to cool.
  2. Mix breadcrumbs and cream in a bowl and let it soak for a few minutes. Add first eggs, then onion and the ground meat. Season with salt and pepper.
  3. Cut the reindeer meat into cubes. Envelope each reindeer cube in ground meat to form eight balls. (If there is time, let the meatballs rest in the fridge for 20 minutes.)
  4. Fry the meatballs in oil and butter on medium heat until golden brown, for around 7–8 minutes. Lift them out of the pan and keep them warm.
Honey-glazed garlic confit:
  1. Sauté the garlic cloves in a pan.
  2. Add vinegar, honey, thyme and cinnamon.
  3. Boil on medium heat for around 20 minutes.
  4. Stir in a knob of butter and season with salt and pepper.
Spicy red cabbage:
  1. Pour some oil into a large saucepan. Add the red cabbage, garam masala, red onion, honey, salt, pepper, port, thyme, sugar and cinnamon.
  2. Simmer on low heat for around 40 minutes.
  3. The meatballs can be served out of the frying pan, with cabbage and sauce on the side.

Notes
If you can’t get hold of reindeer meet, just exclude it from the recipe and do “normal” meatballs with only minced meat. The traditional Swedish way of serving meatballs is with mashed potatoes and lingonberry jam.

The recipe was created by Marcus Samuelsson. Marcus Samuelsson was born in Addis Ababa in Ethiopia in 1970, and adopted by Swedish parents at the age of three. Set on becoming a chef early on in life, Samuelsson had his breakthrough as chef for well-reputed New York restaurant Aquavit in the mid-1990s with his Scandinavian cooking.

Today, he is involved in several restaurants, among them the Swedish Aquavit restaurant in Stockholm, is a guest professor at Umeå University School of Restaurant and Culinary Arts, and has written several inspiring cook books. Samuelsson was also chosen as guest chef for US President Barack Obama’s first official state dinner.