Tag archives for Carl Jan Granqvist

Salmon pudding

Photo: Pål Allan/imagebank.sweden.se

 

Salmon pudding
Main course
4-6
 

Salmon pudding is based on the traditional Swedish housewife’s firm conviction that a good dinner provides an excellent basis for the next day’s lunch. With a little salmon, a little cream and a little potatoes, you can go a very long way. As usual in home cooking, it is possible to vary the ingredients, provided you control the amount of salt. Thus the salmon in the pudding may be boiled, cold-smoked or hot-smoked, since the basic rule is always that “you take what you have” at home. The main thing is to make sure that the result is delicious. Salmon pudding is traditionally eaten with melted butter. A little fresh lemon juice is a tasty alternative.
Ingredients
  • 400 g (14 oz) salt-cured salmon
  • 1½ kg (3¼ lb) unpeeled potatoes
  • 4 eggs
  • 300 ml (1½ cup) heavy whipping cream
  • 300 ml (1½ cup) milk
  • 2 onions
  • 1 large bunch of dill
  • salt, white pepper

Instructions
  1. Boil the potatoes, and peel them once they have cooled.
  2. If desired, presoak the slices of salmon in milk or water for a few hours to draw out the salt.
  3. Peel and slice the onion. Sauté it in a little butter until it softens, without browning.
  4. Grease an ovenproof baking dish, cover the bottom with potato slices, spreading half the onions on top and then half the salmon and chopped dill. Cover with a new layer of potato slices, then the rest of the onion, salmon and dill. Finish with a layer of potato slices.
  5. Beat together milk, cream and eggs plus salt and pepper.
  6. Pour this mixture on top of the salmon pudding and finish with a few pats of butter.
  7. Bake in oven (200°C/400°F) for 45–60 minutes, or until the pudding feels firm.
  8. Serve with melted butter.

Raggmunk

 

 

Photo by Jon Åslund

Raggmunk
Main
4-6
 

Raggmunk is the name for a Swedish potato pancake. The pancakes are fried in butter and served with fried pork and lingonberries. They cannot be made using new potatoes, since potatoes that are harvested in early summer do not contain enough starch to hold the pancake together.
Ingredients
  • 1 egg
  • 90 g (3 ¼ oz) wheat flour
  • 300 ml (1½ cup) milk
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 800 g (28 oz) potatoes
  • 50 g (2 oz) butter
  • 400–500 g (14–18 oz) salt pork
  • raw stirred lingonberries

Instructions
  1. Make a pancake batter using the egg, flour and milk. Add salt.
  2. Peel the potatoes and grate them.
  3. Mix in, then fry small patties of the potato pancake batter in butter until golden brown on both sides.
  4. Fry the pork until crunchy.
  5. Serve with raw stirred lingonberries.

Kroppkakor

Photo: Per-Erik Berglund/imagebank.sweden.se

 

Kroppkakor
Main
4-6
 

Kroppkakor is Swedish for filled potato dumplings. Potatoes have been the staff of life in Sweden during the past few centuries. Despite a variety of local names, potato dumplings are eaten throughout the country.
Ingredients
  • 10 medium-sized potatoes
  • 2–3 egg yolks
  • 150–189 g (5–6½ oz) wheat flour
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 1 onion
  • 200 g (7 oz) salt pork
  • 2 tsp cracked allspice

Instructions
Kroppkakor:
  1. Peel and boil the potatoes. Mash them and mix with the egg yolks and salt. Let the purée cool, then mix in the flour.
  2. Knead the dough thoroughly and shape into a roll.
  3. Chop the pork into small cubes and dice the onion. Fry the pork quickly with the onion and mix with the allspice.
  4. Cut the potato roll into inch-thick slices, make a depression in the center of each slice and fill it with the pork mixture.
  5. Flatten each dumpling so the pork mixture is in the middle and roll into a smooth, even ball.
  6. Boil the dumplings slowly in a pot of lightly salted water without a lid for 5–6 minutes after the dumplings rise to the surface.
Presentation:
  1. Serve with lingonberries and melted butter.
  2. The dumplings can also be cut in half and fried in butter.

Marinated fried Baltic herring

Photo: Per-Erik Berglund/imagebank.sweden.se

 

Marinated fried Baltic herring
Main
4-6
 

Fried Baltic herring is one of hundreds of recipes based on the smaller-sized eastern relative of the North Sea herring. Swedes often say that Baltic herring is better the fatter it is, but the truth is perhaps that all Baltic herring tastes good. Some people prefer to fry the filets laid together with parsley between them. Others want the backbone to stay in. But no one talks about frying Baltic herring in anything but butter.
Ingredients
Fried herring:
  • 1 kg (2¼ lb) Baltic herring filet
  • coarse rye flour
  • salt, white pepper
  • butter
Marinade:
  • 350 g (12 oz) sugar
  • 300 ml (1½ cup) distilled white vinegar (12% alcohol)
  • 600 ml (3 cups) water
  • 2 tbs whole allspice
  • 2–4 bay leaves
  • 2 red onions

Instructions
  1. Place the Baltic herring filets skin side down on a cutting board or similar surface.
  2. Salt them and give them a few turns from the white pepper mill, then put together the filets in pairs.
  3. Roll the filets in coarse rye flour and fry them in butter until golden brown on both sides.
  4. Mix all the marinade ingredients and boil for a few minutes in a pot.
  5. Place the finished fried Baltic herring filets, while still warm, on top of each other in a deep bowl or dish.
  6. Pour the warm marinade over them. Let stand until cool.
  7. Peel the red onion, divide it in two, slice it thin and sprinkle on top.

Poached cold salmon with dill mayonnaise

Photo: Per-Erik Berglund/imagebank.sweden.se

 

Poached cold salmon with dill mayonnaise
Main
6
 

Poached cold salmon is a Swedish Midsummer classic, served with a dollop of mayonnaise and the year’s first new potatoes boiled in dill.
Ingredients
  • 1.2 kg (2½ lb) salmon filets with skin
Marinade:
  • 3 liters (3 qt) water
  • 100 ml (½ cup) white wine vinegar
  • 2 tbs salt
  • 5 white peppercorns
  • 5 whole allspice
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 1 onion
  • 1 carrot
  • ½ leek
Dill mayonnaise:
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 tbs Dijon mustard
  • 1 tbs good vinegar
  • salt, white pepper
  • 200 ml (1 cup) canola oil
  • 100 ml (½ cup) sour cream or crème fraiche
  • 1 bunch of dill

Instructions
Poached salmon:
  1. Clean the salmon filets and remove any remaining bones with tweezers.
  2. Cut the salmon into six equally large pieces and place them in a baking dish or pan with high edges, about a centimeter (½ in) apart. Sprinkle a little salt over them.
  3. Clean and cut the vegetables into slices.
  4. Place all marinade ingredients in a saucepan and boil for 10 minutes.
  5. Pour the boiling marinade over the salmon, covering the fish under at least 1 cm (½ in). Then cover the baking dish with plastic film or wax paper and let it stand and slowly cool.
Dill mayonnaise:
  1. Place an egg yolk, mustard and vinegar plus salt and pepper in a bowl.
  2. Beat with an electric egg beater and add the oil in a thin stream while continuing to beat. Then mix the mayonnaise with sour cream or crème fraiche and finely chopped dill.
  3. Taste and, if necessary, add more mustard and spices.